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( The thin lunar crescent and the speedy little planet shine together in the evening. )

Last week, the observers had a chance to enjoy the rare triple conjunction of Mercury, Jupiter, and Saturn lighting up the evening sky. This week, try to catch the beautiful duo of the pale, thin crescent Moon and the closest planet to the Sun, Mercury.

The conjunction of the Moon and Mercury

The young waxing crescent Moon and Mercury will shine close in the sky the next several days. On January 14, 2021, at 03:14 a.m. EST (08:14 GMT), the 1-day old Moon will pass 2°19' to the south of the speedy little planet. Our natural satellite will be at a magnitude of -8.3, and Mercury will shine at a magnitude of -0.9. …


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Image Credit: Vito Technology

What can you see in the sky from January 12 to 19? Read our stargazing suggestions to find out about planets and stars visible tonight, the Moon phases, and more. In today’s article: the Moon renewed, Mercury moves past Jupiter and Saturn, Mars approaches Uranus, and Taurus shows its treasures!

The Moon this week

At midnight EST on Tuesday night (5:00 GMT on Wednesday), the Moon will officially reach its new phase. While new, the Moon is traveling between the Earth and the Sun. …


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( Catch the rare planetary trio at the beginning of January. )

The rare planetary trio of Mercury, Jupiter, and Saturn graces the evening sky. In today’s article, we will tell you how, when, and where to see this spectacular astronomical event and explain why it is so special.

What is a planetary trio?

As the definition indicates, a planetary trio is formed by three planets that fit within a circle with a diameter of less than 5 degrees. In this case, binoculars will come in useful as typical binoculars have a field of view of 5 degrees or more. …


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Image Credit: Lamberto Sassoli

Welcome to 2021! Hopefully, you managed to make some New Year’s resolutions and planned your astronomical calendar for the year. If not yet, you can make use of our recent article about the most notable space-related events of 2021. And let the first stargazing event of the year be the spectacular Quadrantids! Or not so spectacular in 2021? Read to find out.

What is the Quadrantid meteor shower?

Not so well-known Quadrantids are actually one of the “big three” meteor showers on the planet Earth. The other two you most likely know — the Perseids and the Geminids. In comparison, an hourly rate of meteors for the Perseids is 100; however, the Quadrantids produce around 120 meteors per hour. …


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It’s only a couple of days until we say farewell to 2020 and welcome the new year. This year was full of unpleasant surprises, but on the other hand, it opened lots of new and exciting opportunities. We know that many of you dived into the world of astronomy because of the lockdown, and we’re happy you did! In one of our recent articles, we talked about the main astronomical events of 2020, and today, we’d like to make predictions about the year 2021. Let’s get started!

You can also watch our video about the most notable events of 2021 here. …


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( Observe the last Full Moon of 2020! )

The December Full Moon will adorn the sky on December 30. Read on to learn how and when to observe the last Full Moon of 2020, why it is called the Full Cold Moon, and why the Far-northern December Full Moon is special.

When to see the Full Moon in December 2020?

The last Full Moon of the year will grace the sky on December 29, 2020, at 10:28 p.m. EST (December 30, 2020, at 03:28 GMT). The completely illuminated lunar disk will shine among the stars of the constellation Gemini. …


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Image Credit: Vito Technology

Finally! 2020 is almost gone, and we’re all excited to see what 2021 is preparing for us. But don’t treat 2020 too harshly — despite many difficulties, it was an excellent year for all astronomy lovers. Furthermore, it encouraged many people to start their stargazing journey and brought many newcomers to the stargazing community. And now, around the catholic Christmas, let’s recap some significant astronomical events of 2020!

2020 astronomical events overview

We already published a separate article dedicated to the brightest comets of 2020 and 2021 — there, we obviously mentioned the magnificent NEOWISE. …


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( Celebrate the beginning of a new astronomical season! )

The December Solstice is coming, marking the beginning of a new season and bringing the shortest day of 2020 for the Northern Hemisphere and the longest one for those located in our planet’s southern part. In today’s article, we’ll tell you all you need to know about the December solstice and some interesting facts about this astronomical event.

What is a solstice?

A solstice occurs when the Sun reaches its northernmost or southernmost point from the equator for the year, which is caused by the tilt of the Earth’s axis and our planet’s motion in its orbit around the Sun. …


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Image Credit: Vito Technology

At the end of 2020, around the Catholic Christmas, Jupiter and Saturn will appear the closest since 1623. Here is everything you should know about this once-in-a-lifetime event or so-called “Christmas Star”.

Will Jupiter and Saturn really be so close?

In terms of space distance — no. On the date of their great conjunction, which also happens to be the day of December solstice, Saturn will be about twice as far from the Earth as Jupiter.

For the observers from the Earth — yes. It will be the closest conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn that most of us will ever get to witness. In December, two planets will be only 0.1 …


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( See the beautiful dance of our natural satellite and brilliant gas giants in the sky above you. )

This week, the thin waxing crescent Moon is visiting the Solar System’s two largest planets — Jupiter and Saturn. In our article, you’ll learn how and where to see the beautiful dance of our natural satellite and the brilliant gas giants in the sky above you.

The spectacular gathering of the Moon, Jupiter, and Saturn

The Moon and Jupiter conjunction will take place on December 17, 2020, at 04:30 GMT. The 3-days-old Moon will pass 2°55' to the south of the largest planet of the Solar System. The Moon will shine at a magnitude of -10.0, while the brilliant gas giant will be at a magnitude of -2.0. …

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Star Walk

Point your device at the sky and see what stars, constellations, and satellites you are looking at 🌌✨ https://starwalk.space

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