Planets next to the Moon in August 2022

In August 2022, we’ll see lunar-planetary conjunctions with Saturn, Jupiter, Uranus, Mars, Venus, and Mercury. Find the exact timings in this article.

August 12: Moon-Saturn conjunction

On August 12, at 03:55 GMT, Saturn will pass 3°54' from the Full Moon. Both celestial objects will be in the constellation Capricornus. The planet will shine at a magnitude of 0.3. Spot the star-like dot next to the Moon with the naked eye or via binoculars. With a telescope, you will get a closer view of Saturn and its rings but won’t see the conjunction — the distance between the Moon and the planet will be too far.

August 15: Moon-Jupiter conjunction

On August 15, at 09:37 GMT, the Moon will meet Jupiter in the constellation Cetus. The apparent distance between them will be 1°51', which is too wide to fit within a telescope’s field of view, so use binoculars or observe the scene with the naked eye. Jupiter will shine brightly at a magnitude of -2.8. The 81% illuminated Moon will have a magnitude of -12.5.

August 18: Close approach of the Moon and Uranus

On August 18, at 14:14 GMT, the Moon and Uranus will pass within a mere 31'6″ of each other. It’s a little too far to observe both objects at once through a telescope lens; binoculars will provide a better view of the scene. Stargazers from parts of the United States and Kiribati might also see a lunar occultation of Uranus — the Moon will appear to move in front of the planet. Uranus will have a magnitude of 5.8, and the half-illuminated Moon will shine at a magnitude of -11.9. Find them in the constellation Aries.

August 19: Moon-Mars conjunction

On August 19, at 12:16 GMT, the Moon will pass 2°41' from Mars; both objects will be in the constellation Taurus. The lunar disk (magnitude -11.7) will be illuminated by 42%, and the Red Planet will have a magnitude of 0.0. Observe the conjunction with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars.

August 25: Moon-Venus conjunction

On August 25, at 20:58 GMT, Venus will pass 4°17' from the almost invisible Moon. Our natural satellite will reach its new phase two days later, so its surface will be only 1% illuminated. Enjoy Venus shining at a magnitude of -3.9, bright enough for the unaided eye. Both space objects will be in the constellation Cancer.

August 29: Moon-Mercury conjunction

On August 29, at 10:51 GMT, the Moon will meet Mercury in the constellation Virgo. The apparent distance between them will be 6°38', which is too far to fit within the field of view of the optical devices. However, Mercury shining at a magnitude of 0.2 will be visible to the naked eye. The lunar disk will be 6% illuminated and will appear as a thin waxing crescent.

We wish you clear skies and successful observations!

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